Why mandatory vaccination is nothing new

Mandatory vaccination

Let’s be real about coronavirus — since the current public health crisis began more than a year ago, vaccines have been hard at work waiting for FDA and federal approval.

FDA has approved two vaccines. And the US is getting nearly 1.5 million doses every day. As I write this, the first coronavirus vaccines are just about distributed in the country. Here we’re on the “second half” of the vaccine-ing scenario. Every year, hundreds of thousands of people will receive a dose and develop immunity. This year, as millions and millions of Americans get vaccinated, the virus will continue to spread. It will evolve and probably start over 50% of those vaccines, but the COVID-19 pandemic is far from over.

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The vaccine roll-out is a huge logistical challenge, but it’s nothing new, and it’s been a major issue in the vaccine wars for a while. The World Health Organization has put up a website about Covid-19 and gathered mountains of data. Many vaccines require two doses that are administered at differing times of the day. The US generally produces two Pfizer/BioNTech doses when the first is out. But with so many people vaccinated, there are questions about whether the other coronavirus vaccines require a second dose.

Or the data that the FDA approved the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine without the second dose. Most of us don’t know if Pfizer’s vaccine requires a second dose. But imagine this hypothetical: millions of people get the Pfizer vaccine, all share the same protective immunity the next day — so would that mean that there is a second dose needed? But what about Moderna’s vaccine? What if some people have “great immunity” from their first dose — and yet get more with the second? Is it common?

And how we answer these questions will directly affect the effectiveness of the vaccination rollout. Plus, this is a brand-new vaccine, and we still don’t know if it is safe or potentially dangerous. Vaccine roll-out depends largely on the FDA’s approval of the approved vaccine, and unfortunately, “consumer confidence in the FDA’s vaccine decisions or the FDA’s regulatory processes as applied to health products” as Harvard health researcher Jerome B. Paulson told Harvard surgeon Chandrakant Kakaniya in August.

The focus on “vaccine awareness” and the unwillingness to share vaccine data is potentially a challenge. Early this year, the FDA drafted a public statement on their ethical responsibilities to provide statistical information, but the secretary of health said the agency was more constrained than they could have expected by regulations. Dr. David Kessler, who oversaw the FDA’s vaccine process, agrees that “there are legitimate concerns that the right information will get out if more transparency is demonstrated.”

Should vaccination information be protected on the Internet?

Why mandatory vaccination is nothing new
Why mandatory vaccination is nothing new

The US Food and Drug Administration is a funny situation since information will be available across multiple platforms. There are hundreds of vaccination websites and blogs where information should be shared openly and with precision. mandatory vaccination In addition, there are publicly funded sites with outdated and (most likely) flawed data that should not be held in high regard.

Should the government tell each and every man, woman, and child that you should be vaccinated? Because the data around COVID-19 vaccinations is murky and the vaccine rollout will be touch-and-go, the government shouldn’t send out the message that everyone should be vaccinated at the same time and that a second dose could be possible.

What the government should do is encourage every single family to have their members vaccinated. These are the ideal circumstances in which the public can be vaccinated together and all become vaccinated together. This would be a transparent distribution of vaccine doses and help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

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